Revised trigger of Faucet in Japan and earthqukes


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“Earthquake”, this is what you might associate Japan with. In this entry, I will write about faucet in Japan. First, look at the photos.

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(It’s a secret that I cleaned the faucet for some hours before I took the photos.)

Revised trigger of Faucet

When the trigger is up, water comes out and when the trigger is down, water stops.

There are faucets with the opposite function. (When the trigger is up, water stops and when the trigger is down, water comes out)

When an earthquake is happening, things might fall on faucets. If something falls on the trigger of the faucet (in the photos), water won’t come out because water always stops when the trigger of the faucet is down.

As you may know, Japan has many earthquakes. Therefore, this type of faucet (in the photos) is common now in Japan. Still many faucets with the opposite function exist in Japan, but I think they are old.

To be honest, I’m not used to the faucet in the photo yet. Usually, I try to put the trigger down when I want water. However, I feel nowadays Japan has more earthquakes than before. So, not only faucets, but also other things should be built or made to prevent secondary damages from earthquakes.

Also, I feel earthquake area is spreading. A big earthquake happened in Kumamoto prefecture in April, 2016. Kumamoto prefecture is located in Kushu area and the area was said to have few earthquakes. Therefore, many houses in the area are fragile, compared to the ones in areas like Tokyo. This is why many houses in Kumamoto were destroyed by the earthquake.

If you want to see the epicenter, check https://japan.googleblog.com/2016/07/blog-post_67.html. (This article is Japanese.)

The different reactions when an earthquake is happening


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